Actual evaporation estimation from infrared measurement of soil surface temperature

Abstract

Within the hydrological cycle, actual evaporation represents the second most important process in terms of volumes of water transported, second only to the precipitation phenomena. Several methods for the estimation of the Ea were proposed by researchers in scientific literature, but the estimation of the Ea from potential evapotranspiration often requires the knowledge of hard-to-find parameters (e.g.: vegetation morphology, vegetation cover, interception of rainfall by the canopy, evaporation from the canopy surface and uptake of water by plant roots) and many existing database are characterized by missing or incomplete information that leads to a rough estimation of the actual evaporation amount. Starting from the above considerations, the aim of this study is to develop and validate a method for the estimation of the Ea based on two steps: i) the potential evaporation estimation by using the meteorological data (i.e. Penman-Monteith); ii) application of a correction factor based on the infrared soil surface temperature measurements. The dataset used in this study were collected during two measurement campaigns conducted both in a plain testing site (Grugliasco, Italy), and in a mountain South-East facing slope (Cogne, Italy). During those periods, hourly measurement of air temperature, wind speed, infrared surface temperature, soil heat flux, and soil water content were collected. Results from the dataset collected in the two testing sites show a good agreement between the proposed method and reference methods used for the Ea estimation.

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Published
2013-09-08
Keywords:
Hydrology, surface evaporation, heat fluxes, infrared temperatures, eddy covariance.
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How to Cite
Pognant, D., Canone, D., & Ferraris, S. (2013). Actual evaporation estimation from infrared measurement of soil surface temperature. Journal of Agricultural Engineering, 44(2s). https://doi.org/10.4081/jae.2013.259